Publications

Disclaimer: Reports on the website begin from 2015. If you would like to see a copy of an older report, please contact info@reform.uk

We believe that the quality and excellence of our research is core to our reputation. We are a charity who is dedicated to achieving better and smarter public services. Our mission is to set out ideas that will improve public services for all and deliver value for money.

With the erosion of public trust in traditional sources of information we pride ourselves on producing robust, insightful and independent reports. We engage with and communicate our thinking and research with opinion-formers and decision-makers from across the political spectrum. We purposefully seek to engage with people who have different views to those expressed in our reports during the research process to ensure that we break the echo-chamber in which many think tanks can find themselves in.

Please don’t take our word for it, please read our reports. 

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25th July 2016

Stepping up, breaking barriers. Transforming employment outcomes for disabled people.

This paper is the third in a series on reforming the sickness and disability-related out-of work benefits system. A priority for successive governments, reform to date has been inadequate and progress woeful, as the minimal shift in caseload numbers illustrates – in 2014-15 there were just over 2.5 million working age claimants of incapacity-related benefits, a decade earlier there were almost 2.8 million.

20th July 2016

Delivering the 2015 Spending Review objective of successful NHS partnerships with the private sector

Reform's report, 'Delivering the 2015 Spending Review objective of successful NHS partnerships with the private sector', was produced in partnership with Alliance Medical and is based on case studies of two independent sector partnerships with the NHS. The first is the delivery of intravenous chemotherapy to cancer patients and the provision of PET-CT diagnostic scans. Both cases studies involve The Christie Hospital in Manchester, one of the world's leading cancer centres.

12th July 2016

The Work and Health Programme: levelling the playing field

Government’s approach to outsourcing services has risen up the policy agenda in recent years. The Coalition Government saw high-quality competition between external suppliers as a key lever to deliver value for money for taxpayers and service users alike. In theory, dynamic public-service markets are well-placed to achieve this: at least half the productivity gains of private markets over 10 years can be attributed to the replacement of less-productive firms with more-productive ones.

23rd May 2016

Local commissioning, local solutions: devolving offender management

Over the last 15 years, there has been significant change to the way in which offender management services – i.e. prison and probation – are organised and managed. This has included the introduction of competition, first through private sector run prisons and then more recently through the outsourcing of the bulk of probation services through the Transforming Rehabilitation programme. Successive governments have also sought to create a more integrated offender management system, primarily by bringing prisons and probation closer together through the creation of a single agency – the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) – to manage both.

14th April 2016

The future of public services: digital policing

Reform’s report, The future of public services: digital policing, highlights the important role technology can play in helping the police forces of England and Wales address tomorrow’s challenges. This paper is the second in a series, conducted in partnership with Accenture, looking at the transformative role technology will play in the future delivery of public services.

12th April 2016

Who cares? The future of general practice

The core delivery model for general practice has remained largely unchanged since the creation of the National Health Service (NHS) in 1948. General practices are independent businesses, contracted by the state to provide defined health services to a registered list of patients. Practices are owned and run by one or more ‘partners’ – general practitioners (GPs) who hold contracts and share the profits their practice delivers. In theory, this incentivises the most effective care for all patients – from a young, healthy person requiring one-off treatment to an elderly patient with a variety of long-term conditions.